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  • All recreation programming and events are suspended.  In addition, we have closed recreation facilities for programming including Red Mountain Center, Eagles Community Center, Jefferson Recreation Center, Webster Recreation Center, Mesa Tennis Center, Kino Aquatic Center and Skyline Aquatic Center. Private rentals of City parks and facilities will be managed on a case by case basis with event organizers.

  • City playgrounds, volleyball, tennis, basketball courts, pickleball courts, and splash pads are closed.

  • Riverview, Red Mountain and Greenfield lakes remain open for fishing, however, Arizona Game and Fish has suspended their stocking program until further notice.

  • All open spaces, passive play spaces, dog parks, trails, and walking paths will remain open for public use from sunrise to 10 PM.  Physical distancing guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) still apply in these areas.

    • The following park restrooms will remain open and will receive cleaning and supply service as resources allow. All other park restrooms remain closed until further notice.
      • Greenfield Park
      • Pioneer Park
      • Red Mountain Park
      • Riverview Park

  • While parks are cleaned and maintained on a regular basis, we encourage users to remember, the best way to reduce the risk of getting sick and to avoid COVID-19:
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • Stay home when you are sick.
    • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
    • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

                Updates will continue to be provided at https://www.mesaaz.gov/city-hall/coronavirus  and our City of Mesa social media channels.

     

Conservation

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Mesa's Parks, Recreation and Community Facilities Department is involved with many projects and partnerships in an ongoing effort to promote conservation and involvement with the environment. Check out just a few of the department's activities below: 

 Trail The new Desert Arroyo Park is now open. This beautiful 58-acre parcel of native desert uplands is located at the northeast corner of McKellips and Ellsworth Roads. The park takes full advantage of the site’s natural desert landscape with a passive park focusing on experiencing the native desert.
 Mariposa Park  

Located at 2351 S. Hawes Road, the nine acre Mariposa Park has three nature themed play pockets that children can climb, jump and explore in. There are eight fitness stations that run along the perimeter of the park with two of the stations meeting ADA requirements. The main playground has two play features. All the play equipment promotes children and teens to become physically active through discovery and play.

 mesa-urban-garden-for-web Located in the heart of downtown Mesa, the Mesa Urban Garden is a community organization that provides fresh produce directly to the community and local food banks.
 butterfly-for-web

As part of the Monarch Project, butterfly waystations were recently constructed at the Jefferson & Webster Recreation Centers to promote the population of the endangered Monarch butterfly. Please visit the Jefferson Recreation Center and the Webster Recreation Center for information on other community activities.

Update on the rebound of the Monarch population!

 CM-living-green-for-web A highlight of the spring Celebrate Mesa event, the Living Green Village shares information on sustainability, green ideas and protecting the natural environment.  Visit the Sustainability page for some great ideas and opportunities.
 Tree City Logo Full Color Mesa is recognized as a Tree City USA community. This national program provides the framework for community forestry management for cities and towns across America. Communities achieve Tree City USA status by meeting four core standards of sound urban forestry management: maintaining a tree board or department, having a community tree ordinance, spending at least $2 per capita on urban forestry and celebrating Arbor Day.